Terry Glenn Phipps
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Ludwig Hilberseimer & Alfred Caldwell (Landscape Architect) | Lafayette Park | Detroit, Michigan | 1955-________________________________

I finally got my hands on the May 1960 issue of Architecture Forum, with the Lafayette Park cover story: “A tower plus rowhouses in Detroit”.
A few of my favorite things about this article include:
"A proof that the occupants of the Detroit row houses really are relaxed is manifested in the very diverse systems of decoration they have used very successfully in these uniform houses.  Ranging from colonial to Eames, these interiors are neither a shock nor a disaster, as the inept decoration of a precise Mies high-rise apartment usually is."
"…the bold planning vision on which Detroit has staked its future depends on these people in Lafayette Park who are willing to take charge of their personal piece of the city."
"Perhaps the most obvious distinction the residents of the Park have over residents of more conventional suburbs is the high incidence of career wives and mothers.  At least 14 have full-time careers, and and many more work part time."
"At least one enterprising eight-year-old from the townhouse group is doing a flourishing business walking dogs for apartments residents."
"Perhaps the most serious error was that of trying to clear slums, raise tax revenue, and re-establish an urban residential core, all at once.  In a different location, and with the single objective of re-establishing an urban core, Lafayette Park would now be an unquestioned success.  But having gone this far toward the impossible, Detroit will, no doubt, still rally enough to push all the objectives through.  If so, she will attain a veteran’s standing in the struggle to save cities."
And why is the child on the sidewalk so upset?  I find that an interesting photo to include with the article.
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Edith Farnsworth Residence | Plano, Illinois | 1946-1951
Photos: Ethan Zisson (not for commercial use)
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (German-American, 1886-1969) | With Phyllis Lambert during the construction of the Seagram Building | c. 1956-1958
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Master Plan | Illinois Institute of Technology | Chicago, Illinois | 1939-1946
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969)| Minerals and Metals Research Building | Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) | Chicago, Illinois | 1942-1943
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969)| Minerals and Metals Research Building | Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) | Chicago, Illinois | 1942-1943
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | Landhaus Lemke | Berlin Obersee | 1932
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) with Philip Johnson (1906-2005) | The Seagram Building | 375 Park Avenue | New York | 1958 
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | S.R. Crown Hall | IIT Campus (Illinois Institute of Technology) | Chicago Illinois | 1950-56